Mastery for a purpose

In my previous blog post I referenced the weekly ‘grammar gym’ mastery sessions that I have been doing with my concrete project group in year 9.  This developed out of watching primary teachers in my old school teaching sentence forms and then practicing them repeatedly. It was something I stole at the time and used with a year 11 group as practice, and have been playing with strategies of grammar mastery since then.

When I first taught the concrete project group in year 7, I began to use this strategy to teach the group some of the sentence structures and connectives that were missing from their toolkit of language at that time. It’s not something I’ve needed to do so explicitly before as a secondary teacher.  Yes, I’ve reviewed grammar rules, and taught the use of more complex sentence structures, but I’d never previously had to explicitly teach students to use more than simple unconnected sentences, and the very basics of connectives/constructing a sentence.  As time has gone on with this group, the skills we learn and repeat in the grammar gym (always within context of the project we are working on) have become increasingly sophisticated.

It’s been really interesting watching the impact of this weekly practice and instant feedback/instruction on students individual writing and shared writing.  See for example a selection of one student’s grammar gym work from across year 9 so far as he has got to grips with using  who or which to add more information into a sentence.

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An early Grammar Gym from the term before the concrete project, when we first attempted these sentences. It’s clear that the purpose of this sentence structure is not understood at this point.

 

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A heavily supported Grammar Gym from the same student early in the concrete project.
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His independent attempt in this Grammar Gym displays his growing understanding of the purpose of this sentence structure and interestingly shows him punctuating accurately too.  He has taken on a really complex sentence in this, a significant growth in his control of language.
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Completely independent from a few weeks ago! This doesn’t just show a memorising of a language form, but a conceptual growth.

His competence using complete sentences, commas to control subordinate clauses and his understanding of the function of such sentence structures have grown significantly from initial heavily supported attempts to completely independent craft.  And this competence is vital to the progress of these students; I’m actually not necessarily a huge fan of repeated grammar practice and drill but for these students, all of whom arrived at School 21 lacking some key skills for accurate and flexible communication and with gaps in language development, this internalising of language forms and structures is incredibly liberating and vital.

However, I’d argue that the increasing levels of competence of these students relate to the want and need they have for these skills: the purpose that the authentic project has provided. They need to be able to describe their maths accurately and fluently (an early foray out into Stratford to speak to the public about the factory proposal brought the group to the realisation that “we need to be really clear about what we mean – people don’t all understand maths…”). They want the LLDC to take them seriously and understand the findings their report has exposed. They need written fluency, eloquence and control. This brings me back to the interlinked need for competence, autonomy and relatedness in the project.  You can of course teach English from a competence alone stance, but when taking the importance of relatedness into account, there is suddenly a real purpose for these skills, a need for the competence to increase and a desire to graft away in order to do so.

 

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Jess Hughes

English teacher and coach at School21 in Stratford, East London. Interested in authentic learning, CPD, literacy and culture. @jess_k_hughes

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